Graham's Story

A serious accident when he was 18 years old resulted in Graham Myers, now 51, sustaining third degree burns to his face, neck and hands.graham

But whilst the accident left Graham facing numerous surgeries and significant time in hospital, it was not a barrier to a successful career as his current position as Group Financial Controller at Croda International Plc demonstrates. Croda is a global business which sits just outside the FTSE 100 index, and his role is one of the most senior there, bringing with it a seat on the Group’s Executive Committee, a real success story.

He explained: ”It’s the people that really make the business what it is and such a great place to work, although it helps that a key part of of the role involves finance and working with numbers, both key strengths of mine. As I have moved up through the company I have become more and more involved with many different aspects of the business, most recently investor relations, and it is such a varied and diverse global business that there is always something new to challenge one’s boundaries.”

Graham, who lives in and works in Yorkshire, but travels nationally and internationally for work, had just sat his A ‘levels and applied to university at the time of his accident. 

He said: “I started reading engineering at university but realised it wasn’t for me and would be a real challenge due to the injuries to my hands, so I changed over and did a law degree.

Once I graduated though I knew law wasn’t right for me and I chose accountancy, joining Garbutt & Elliott, a Charted Accountants in York, and gained my qualifications there before joining Croda – a difficult decision at the time as they’d given me my first employment chance and an excellent grounding in the world of finance.”

Croda was actually the first job that Graham applied for as a qualified accountant and he does not think the firm gave his visible difference a second thought.

He said: “I am really not conscious of having any problems in the work place in relation to how I look, although I know outside work people do sometimes stare. I do think that sometimes my appearance can be an advantage as people sometimes underestimate my ability – but more fool them.”

Graham’s advice to anyone with a facial disfigurement wanting to get into work, or build on their career, is to be positive.

He said: “The key thing is to just be yourself and focus on your strengths. Even with my experience I still don’t always find it easy sometimes standing in front on large groups of people, but I think most people have problems at times, mostly much bigger than mine, and you just work through and get on with it.”

 serious accident when he was 18 years old resulted in Graham Myers, now 51, sustaining third degree burns to his face, neck and hands.

But whilst the accident left Graham facing numerous surgeries and significant time in hospital, it was not a barrier to a successful career as his current position as Group Financial Controller at Croda International Plc demonstrates. Croda is a global business which sits just outside the FTSE 100 index, and his role is one of the most senior there, bringing with it a seat on the Group’s Executive Committee, a real success story.

He explained: ”It’s the people that really make the business what it is and such a great place to work, although it helps that a key part of of the role involves finance and working with numbers, both key strengths of mine. As I have moved up through the company I have become more and more involved with many different aspects of the business, most recently investor relations, and it is such a varied and diverse global business that there is always something new to challenge one’s boundaries.”

Graham, who lives in and works in Yorkshire, but travels nationally and internationally for work, had just sat his A ‘levels and applied to university at the time of his accident. 

He said: “I started reading engineering at university but realised it wasn’t for me and would be a real challenge due to the injuries to my hands, so I changed over and did a law degree.

Once I graduated though I knew law wasn’t right for me and I chose accountancy, joining Garbutt & Elliott, a Charted Accountants in York, and gained my qualifications there before joining Croda – a difficult decision at the time as they’d given me my first employment chance and an excellent grounding in the world of finance.”

Croda was actually the first job that Graham applied for as a qualified accountant and he does not think the firm gave his visible difference a second thought.

He said: “I am really not conscious of having any problems in the work place in relation to how I look, although I know outside work people do sometimes stare. I do think that sometimes my appearance can be an advantage as people sometimes underestimate my ability – but more fool them.”

Graham’s advice to anyone with a facial disfigurement wanting to get into work, or build on their career, is to be positive.

He said: “The key thing is to just be yourself and focus on your strengths. Even with my experience I still don’t always find it easy sometimes standing in front on large groups of people, but I think most people have problems at times, mostly much bigger than mine, and you just work through and get on with it.”